To do for April 3: Take Personality Test

Hi all,

In addition to doing the readings for next week – for fun and possibly for some insight into how you can best work together with others on your team – take this version of the Myers-Briggs test and note your results in the comments of this post. Obviously you can take it with a grain of salt, but at least for me the results are always dead on.

Thanks to Dr. Lurene Kelley for the link.

I’m an ENFJ.

 

 

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17 thoughts on “To do for April 3: Take Personality Test

  1. rars22 says:

    My personality type: ENFP

    Diplomats (INFJs, INFPs, ENFJs and ENFPs):

    Intuitive and Feeling types – they are cooperative, empathic and imaginative, focusing on empathy, morality and cooperation.

    Overall Characteristics:

    Forming around 7% of the population, people with the ENFP personality type tend to be curious, idealistic, and often mystical. They seek meaning and are very interested in other people’s motives, seeing life as a big, complex puzzle where everything is connected. Not surprisingly, ENFPs tend to be very insightful and empathic individuals. This, plus their charm and social skills, often makes them very popular and influential.

    On the other hand, this can also be a disadvantage as the ENFP is likely to worry about not being sufficiently original or spontaneous. If they are not careful, this personality trait can lower their self-esteem.

    ENFP personalities are usually characterized by high levels of enthusiasm, especially when it comes to things that spark their imagination. In such cases, ENFPs can be very energetic and convincing; they are able to easily persuade other people to join their cause. Ironically, this trait can also turn against the ENFP , when they suddenly find themselves center stage, being seen as leaders and inspiring gurus by other people. ENFPs strive to be independent, so they do not always welcome such attention.

    ENFP personalities are very emotional and sensitive, believing feelings are something everyone should take time to understand and express. However, this trait can also cause a lot of stress for them as ENFPs may often focus too much on other people’s motives and the possible meanings behind their actions. People with this personality type are sharp-eyed and intuitive, but they can make serious mistakes when they try to use their interpretation of other people’s emotions as a basis for their decisions.

    ENFPs are also likely to have difficulties dealing with routine, administrative matters. They are more interested in freedom and inspiration than security and stability, and this attitude is usually clearly visible: an ENFP would rather try to come up with an interesting solution or an idea, no matter how difficult that is, than deal with simple yet boring tasks.

    People with the ENFP personality type know how to relax, drawing on their imagination, enthusiasm, and people skills. For instance, they can be very serious and passionate about work during the day and then later let off steam at a wild party in a nightclub. This switch between the two modes can often be instantaneous, surprising even their closest friends.

    Finally, ENFPs are non-conformists, following their own path and trusting their intuition. Their talents are numerous, but they all depend on the ENFP being given enough freedom. People with this personality type can quickly become impatient and dejected if they get stuck in a boring role where they are unable to freely express themselves. But when the ENFP finally finds their place in the world, their imagination, empathy, and courage are likely to produce incredible results.

    Career Paths:

    There are so many potential ENFP careers that it is difficult to list everything in one short article. However, we hope that the details that follow will help some ENFPs in their search for the ideal job. This is one of the most universal personality types, jack-of-all-trades and master-of-many . As long as the ENFP does not get into a career path that is definitely unsuitable for them, they are likely to do well in any role.

    To begin with, ENFPs have excellent social skills and are astonishingly perceptive. This personality type is unsurpassed when it comes to networking and finding out what makes people tick, which is a great skill in any career. Furthermore, ENFPs have a unique ability to communicate with others on their own level, which allows them to create strong and lasting relationships. Due to these traits, typical ENFP careers involve a lot of personal interaction and require good people skills. For instance, ENFPs can be excellent psychologists, teachers, counselors, diplomats, or politicians .

    Next, ENFPs tend to be very talented, energetic, and future-oriented. They can easily compete with Analysts (NT) in the career field when it comes to seeing the bigger picture or finding the underlying principle. Furthermore, despite being a Feeling (F) type, ENFPs excel at using their logic, forming a very potent combination of intuition and rationality. They can focus on the main goal and then put together the plan to achieve that goal. There are many potential careers that make good use of these ENFP traits: people with this personality type tend to be brilliant system analysts, scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs . This is where ENFPs can truly shine. For instance, scientists and engineers with great networking and people skills are extraordinarily rare. The same can be said about other ENFP careers, but this is an excellent example of how effective ENFPs can be in certain jobs.

    Finally, people with this personality type have excellent communication skills, both written and verbal. ENFPs can also be truly inspiring leaders in many careers, but they do not try to control or enjoy controlling other people. However, there are several weak spots in their armor. First, ENFPs need to feel appreciated by their colleagues and superiors; lacking this can threaten their emotional stability in certain cases or careers. Second, ENFPs get bored quite quickly and consequently tend to jump from project to project looking for some new and exciting ideas.
    Third, ENFPs dislike dealing with monotonous tasks and are likely to do everything they can to avoid them. These traits may hinder their progress in certain careers; however, some ENFPs turn them into strengths. For instance, ENFPs do very well in careers such as writing, journalism, acting, or TV reporting ; such jobs can ensure that the ENFP never runs out of interesting ideas, and they have a big audience to keep them going for a long time.

    Workplace Habits: :

    If you are working for a large company, you probably already know an ENFP colleague, manager, or subordinate. People with the ENFP personality type seem to be everywhere, even though they make up only around 5 percent of the population. Furthermore, they can easily get along with nearly all other personality types, which makes them ideal coworkers. So what are ENFPs like in the workplace?

    ENFP colleagues:

    *Warm, tolerant, and genuine
    *Very good at sensing their colleagues’ motives
    *Sensitive and supportive
    *Able to relax and have fun, cheering up their colleagues without much effort
    *Sincerely interested in other people
    *Strive for win-win situations at all times

    ENFP managers:

    *Instinctively know what motivates their subordinates
    *Very observant
    *Excellent listeners
    *May have difficulties punishing misbehaving subordinates
    *Able to inspire and motivate other people
    *Open-minded, dislike bureaucracy and restrictive rules

    ENFP subordinates:

    *Highly analytical, especially when it comes to understanding another person’s perspective
    *Creative and original
    *May get stressed easily
    *Loyal and devoted
    *Enjoy exploring new areas and learning new things
    *Very independent, loathe being micromanaged
    *May have difficulties focusing on one particular project

    Strengths & Weaknesses:

    ENFP strengths:

    *Observant. ENFP personalities believe that there are no irrelevant details or actions. They try to notice everything, seeing all events as part of a big, mysterious puzzle called life.

    *Very popular and friendly. ENFP are altruistic and cooperative, doing their best to be empathic and friendly in every situation. They can get along with nearly everyone and usually have a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

    *Energetic and enthusiastic. ENFP are always eager to share their ideas with other people and get their opinions in return. Their enthusiasm is contagious and very inspiring at the same time.

    *Know how to relax. People with this personality type know how to switch off and have fun, simply experiencing life and everything it has to offer. Their wild bursts of enthusiastic energy can often surprise even their closest friends.

    *Excellent communicators. ENFPs tend to have great people skills, and they instantly know how to present their ideas in a convincing way. They can handle both small talk and deep, meaningful conversations, although the ENFP’s definition of small talk may be somewhat unusual—they will steer the conversation toward ideas rather than weather, gossip, etc.

    *Curious. ENFPs are very imaginative and open-minded. They enjoy trying out new things and do not hesitate to go outside their comfort zone if necessary.

    ENFP weaknesses:

    *Highly emotional. ENFP personalities tend to have very intense emotions, seeing them as an inseparable part of their identity. This may often cause the ENFP to react strongly to criticism, conflicts, or tension.

    *May have poor practical skills. ENFPs are brilliant when it comes to solving problems, creating processes, or initiating projects (especially if they involve other people). However, they are likely to find it difficult to follow through and deal with the practical, administrative side of things.

    *Overthink things. ENFPs always look for hidden motives and tend to overthink even the simplest things, constantly asking themselves why someone did what they did and what that might mean.

    *Get stressed easily. ENFPs are very sensitive and care deeply about other people’s feelings. This can cause them a lot of stress sometimes: people often look to them for guidance and encouragement, and the ENFP cannot always say “yes.”

    *Find it difficult to focus. People with the ENFP personality type lose interest quickly if their project shifts toward routine, administrative matters. They may not be able to stop their mind from wandering off.

    *Very independent. ENFPs loathe being micromanaged or restrained by rules and guidelines. They want to be seen as highly independent individuals, masters of their own fates.

    Friendships

    ENFP personalities are likely to be cheerful, sincere, and open-minded friends. They rarely have any difficulties understanding other personality types and interacting with them in their “language.” This is a very rare and valuable trait. Even though some of the ENFP’s friends may be unable to reciprocate, they will certainly recognize and appreciate the ENFP’s efforts. People with this personality type are usually able to draw even the most reserved friend out of their shell.

    Because ENFPs are so intuitive, they rarely have any difficulties finding out what drives and inspires their friends. ENFPs’ ’ enthusiasm and warmth can be very infectious as they stem from the pure idealism this personality type is known for. However, ENFPs should make sure that their attention does not get tiring—not every friend can cope with the never-ending stream of ideas and topics that an ENFP’s mind can generate.

    ENFP friends tend to be very caring and supportive, but they also need to make sure that their own needs are being met. People with this personality type may sometimes get too deeply involved in the lives of their friends, forgetting to pay enough attention to themselves. Furthermore, ENFPs also tend to harbor unrealistic expectations when it comes to friendships. This can potentially lead to stress and disappointment once the ENFP realizes that their friends are not as flawless or dedicated as they would like them to be.

    Generally, ENFP friends are likely to be quite idealistic and sensitive. This sensitivity enables them to connect with their friends and acquaintances very easily, but it also makes the ENFP very vulnerable to criticism. This is why ENFPs tend to avoid people with strongly expressed Thinking (T) or Judging (J) traits. Those personality types are likely to have strong opinions about a variety of topics, and the ENFP is likely to feel quite uncomfortable arguing with them.

    That being said, ENFPs are fascinated by mysteries and will do their best to understand the other person if they sense that there is some substance beneath the surface. This is one of the reasons why ENFPs tend to form extremely strong friendships with Diplomat (NF) and Analyst (NT) types.

  2. alables says:

    Your personality type: ENFJ.
    Breakdown of preferences: Mind – Extraverted (22%), Energy – Intuitive (9%), Nature – Feeling (4%), Tactics – Judging (11%), Identity – Turbulent (8%).

    ENFJ personality
    Barack Obama ENFJRepresenting approximately 2 percent of all people, the ENFJ personality type tends to be very influential, often without making any conscious effort to increase their influence. As part of the Diplomats (NF) group, ENFJs are genuinely interested in other people and radiate authenticity, concern, and altruism. Not surprisingly, those who surround ENFJs usually find them very inspiring and likeable.

    ENFJs are usually very charismatic and eloquent and find it natural and easy to communicate their ideas and opinions, especially in person. It does not really matter whether they are presenting cold facts or expressing raging emotions; the ENFJ will not be afraid to stand up and speak, regardless of the audience.

    Everything you do right now ripples outward and affects everyone. Your posture can shine your heart or transmit anxiety. Your breath can radiate love or muddy the room in depression. Your glance can awaken joy. Your words can inspire freedom. Your every act can open hearts and minds.
    David Deida
    This is one of the reasons why ENFJs can be so convincing and mesmerizing when they speak: they instinctively know how to combine passion and rational arguments, drawing the audience’s attention and reaching every mind. People with this personality type can be great leaders, and they do not necessarily have to get into politics to make a difference. An ENFJ teacher or coach can have a strong positive effect on many people’s lives as well.

    ENFJ personalities are very intuitive. They find it easy to sense other people’s motives and find connections between seemingly unrelated events. ENFJs also tend to be quite good at analyzing their own feelings and questioning them if necessary.

    On the other hand, such intuitiveness and sensitivity can also cause significant difficulties for people with this personality type. They may be too altruistic and empathic, getting too involved in other people’s problems. They may then find it difficult to detach and stop worrying. In extreme cases, this can even affect the ENFJs’ perception of themselves.

    ENFJs are optimistic idealists, often trusting other people more than they should—although this usually turns out to be a self-fulfilling prophecy. As already mentioned above, ENFJs can be very convincing and inspiring. People are drawn toward strong personalities, and the ENFJ’s charisma can often be a uniting and motivating factor.

  3. Barry Parks says:

    ESFP personality overall description

    For ESFP personalities, life is a never-ending party. Forming around 7.5% of the population, ESFPs love being the center of attention and enjoy even the simplest things. Their fun and impulsive nature is usually very attractive to other people. People with this personality type never run out of ideas and their curiosity is insatiable. They will always be among the first to try something new and exciting.

    ESFPs love communicating with other people and can spend hours upon hours chatting about various topics. An ESFP has no clearer telltale than spending the last hour talking about everything but the topic that was supposed to be the main reason for the conversation. Not surprisingly, this personality type tends to be very popular in the company of Extraverted (E) types.

    ESFP personalities live in the world of opportunities and savor the pleasures, dramas, and ideas that life throws at them. They are immersed in a never-ending performance, trying to cheer other people up. ESFPs are extremely talented at making other people feel good and excited, and they enjoy this immensely. The earthy and often unique wit of ESFPs is a perfect symbol of their playfulness.

    ESFPs have a highly developed aesthetical sense, which is one of their strongest personality traits. This type of person will enjoy creating well-decorated surroundings and recognize the value of quality in many other things.

    ESFP personalities are very observant, able to notice and respond to someone’s distressed emotional state. As planning and long-term thinking are often their weakest personality traits, ESFPs may be inferior strategists and planners, but they are very well equipped to provide practical advice and emotional support.

    The main weakness for many ESFPs is their spontaneity, which can lead to superficiality and forgetfulness. They place more emphasis on quick satisfaction than they do on their obligations and duties. ESFPs are also likely to do their best to ignore potential conflicts instead of dealing with them head-on.

    It is likely that the ESFP personality will be very practical, but not when it comes to repetitive or analytical tasks. They would rather rely on their luck or ask other people for help than spend time trying to understand a complex theory

    ESFP careers

    Even though ESFPs are commonly referred to as “party people,” typical ESFP careers do not always reflect this sentiment. People with this personality type tend to be independent and resourceful, and these traits help them tremendously on the career ladder.

    To begin with, the most important trait shared by all ESFPs is their desire for excitement, stimulation, and novelty. People with this personality type seek new challenges, take pleasure in socializing with many different people, and always focus on the present. Some of the best ESFP careers focus on these traits. For instance, ESFPs tend to be excellent entertainers, photographers, event planners, and sales representatives.

    Next, ESFPs are truly interested in other people, and they know how to make them happy, even in difficult situations. As already mentioned above, ESFPs can be very resourceful, especially when their help is badly needed. Contact with other people is crucial for this personality type, and almost all ESFP career paths are based on this need. ESFPs can be wonderful and inspiring counselors, social workers, personal coaches, consultants, etc. They can also be brilliant medical professionals, especially in the paramedic/EMT fields. ESFPs’ empathy and ability to improvise can be very valuable in challenging situations.

    Furthermore, ESFPs are very spontaneous; there are very few things they loathe more than a strictly scheduled, structured, and monotonous grind. Theoretical writing, a nine-to-five administrative job, or meticulous data analysis are akin to torture for ESFPs. Any careers that involve such or similar things are highly unsuitable for this personality type. In contrast, the best ESFP jobs give them enough freedom to show their love for novelty, aesthetics, and new experiences. Typical ESFP careers include fashion or interior design, tourism, trip planning, etc.

    In general, these are the key things to remember as far as ESFP careers are concerned: they need a lot of contact with other people, more so than any other personality type; their thirst for new challenges is unquenchable; and they need to feel that their work is being appreciated by others.

    ESFP personality in the workplace

    There is no workplace that ESFP personalities would not be able to cheer up. ESFPs are likely to be very social, relaxed, yet extremely practical employees and managers. It is quite easy to recognize them, regardless of the environment.

    ESFP as colleagues
    • Irreplaceable when you need fun and exciting ideas
    • Very social and spontaneous, enjoy interacting with other people
    • Likely to be very popular
    • Witty and enthusiastic
    • Very observant, able to accurately judge the atmosphere at work
    • Dislike criticism, especially if it is related to their habits

    ESFP as managers
    • Enjoy being the center of attention
    • Focused on “here and now”
    • Very good at preventing conflict situations and making their subordinates feel relaxed
    • Do not care much about their authority or social status and prefer horizontal hierarchies
    • Can be very resourceful and inspiring

    ESFP as subordinates
    • Enjoy experimenting and trying out new ideas
    • Excellent brainstormers, able to effortlessly jump from one thought to another
    • May be somewhat forgetful and focused on quick returns
    • Very creative and practical at the same time
    • Honest and direct
    • Prefer freedom and independence to safety and security
    • Loathe repetitive and strictly defined tasks

    ESFP strengths

    • Bold. ESFPs want to experience things, to try everything there is to try. They do not mind going outside their comfort zone or exploring something that others are reluctant to do.
    • Original. ESFP personalities like to experiment and enjoy standing out in the crowd. They do not really care about traditions or what other people expect them to do.
    • Excellent people skills. ESFPs tend to be very witty and talkative—they would never run out of things to discuss. They also strongly dislike being alone and enjoy communicating with other people whenever possible.
    • Great sense of aesthetics and beauty. ESFPs are very artistic, especially when it comes to entertaining other people; this personality type is unmatched in this area.
    • Practical. ESFPs are interested only in practical matters. They dislike theoretical or philosophical discussions, seeing them as a waste of their time.
    • Very observant. ESFP personalities live in the present moment and focus exclusively on what is happening “here and now.” They find it easy to notice real, tangible things and changes.

    ESFP weaknesses

    • Find it difficult to focus. ESFPs get bored very quickly and want to stay entertained and excited for as long as possible, regardless of the situation. Not surprisingly, they are likely to find it difficult to deal with tasks that require patience, focus, and dedication.
    • Very sensitive. People with this personality type are extremely expressive and emotional, making no efforts to conceal their feelings. They are likely to react very emotionally in the face of criticism or if they are pushed into a corner and are unable to make a decision.
    • Poor planners. ESFPs rarely think about the future and are more concerned about the present moment, refusing to worry about the next steps or potential consequences.
    • Always seek excitement. ESFPs take risks and are often self-indulgent, putting the pleasures of the present above stability or long-term plans.
    • Have difficulties in the academic environment. ESFPs see school as a waste of time. They are far more interested in creative, practical things as well as socializing. People with this personality type are likely to find it difficult to stick to schedules and put in enough effort to succeed in the academic environment.
    • Loathe conflicts. ESFP personalities do everything they can to ignore potential conflicts, often pretending to be interested or concerned, but then going on to do something they see as fun.

    ESFP friends

    ESFP personalities are bound to have many friends—it is nearly impossible to resist their enthusiasm and optimism. People with this personality type focus entirely on the present and always find something exciting to experience and share with their friends. This does not mean that their relationships are shallow or based entirely on pleasure—quite the contrary. ESFPs are sincerely interested in other people, but they simply believe that there is no point in living if you cannot feel truly alive.

    On the other hand, that excellent control of all five senses, which all ESFP personalities share, may push them to engage in risky behavior, e.g., gambling, promiscuity, overconsumption of alcohol, etc. This is why it is very important for ESFPs to have friends with different personality types instead of surrounding themselves with people who act and think in the same way (e.g., other Explorers (SP)).

    Generally speaking, ESFP friends are unlikely to have any difficulties communicating with other personality types. ESFPs are very direct, even blunt sometimes, but their openness and charm are very disarming. People with this personality type know how to have fun and are more than happy to share that fun with their friends, as long as they are willing to reciprocate.

    ESFPs will stay away from intellectual, logical discussions unless they revolve around practical, daily, and exciting matters; consequently, ESFP personalities may find it quite difficult to relate to Analysts (NT) or Diplomats (NF). Even then, the ESFP friend will probably be able to come up with an idea or an activity that they will both enjoy.

  4. Ketevan Dolidze says:

    Here is what I got for mine!
    Personality type: ESTP. Interesting but some parts don’t match up at all. 😦

    Explorers (ISTPs, ISFPs, ESTPs and ESFPs):
    Observant and Prospecting types – they are spontaneous, practical and inventive, able to quickly think on their feet and make best use of their surroundings.

    ESTP strengths
    Bold. ESTPs enjoy pushing the limits and discovering areas that they have not yet explored, taking risks if necessary.
    Honest and direct. ESTP personalities do not mince words and prefer direct, honest answers. They see little point in mind games or social niceties.
    Very perceptive. ESTPs can easily pick up on changes in someone’s habits or appearance, and they will always know how to use that information to connect to the other person.
    Original. ESTPs enjoy experimenting and coming up with ideas and solutions that no one has thought of before.
    Rational and practical. People with this personality type do not place much importance on feelings, emotions, or ideas that are philosophical in nature. ESTPs mostly care about what makes sense and has practical uses.
    Great people skills. ESTPs do not really seek to lead or manage people, but they tend to have excellent networking skills and instinctively know how to make the best use of every social interaction.

    ESTP weaknesses
    Do not care much about rules. ESTPs are more interested in what works or makes sense to them than what is permitted or expected by society. They loathe being constrained by rules and regulations.
    Take a lot of risks. ESTP personalities do not mind taking risks and enjoy the rush of adrenaline. They may even take risks on purpose if they are bored.
    Have difficulties in the academic environment. People with this personality type are very practical, action-oriented, and hands-on individuals. They may find it difficult to cope with tasks that require patience, repetition, and theoretical knowledge.
    May be insensitive. ESTPs put rationality above feelings and may be quite uncomfortable in emotionally charged situations, not knowing how to deal with other people’s emotions. Likewise, they are likely to have difficulties expressing their own feelings.
    Impatient. ESTPs want to stay excited, and their minds are used to jumping from one thing to another, always looking for something more interesting. Consequently, they may find it difficult to remain focused for an extended period of time.
    Often miss the bigger picture. ESTP personalities prefer to jump in and deal with the problem “here and now,” which often causes them to miss the bigger picture.

    ESTP personalities tend to be enthusiastic, often unpredictable individuals who know how to enjoy the present moment and have fun regardless of what they are doing; this applies to their relationships as well. People with this personality type are very good at improvisation, and this trait is usually clearly visible, especially when the ESTP is still dating. Whatever happens, their partners will never be able to complain that the relationship was boring.

    ESTPs enjoy practical, fun activities and encourage their partners to explore them as well. It is very unlikely that someone with this personality type will enjoy long conversations revolving around philosophical topics; rather, they will come up with yet another little hobby or an interesting idea. However, the ESTPs’ need to feel excited can also endanger the stability of their relationships. If someone with the ESTP personality type gets bored, they will naturally seek other sources of excitement, and this may result in them looking for a new partner. As ESTPs also tend to be very charming and popular, this is rarely a daunting task for them.

    This does not mean that all ESTPs are unfaithful in romantic relationships. While they are more likely to engage in risky behavior than most other personality types, they are also rational thinkers and are able to control those urges if they choose to. Besides the thirst for excitement that ESTPs are known for, people with this personality type also dislike long-term planning and prefer dealing with things as they come, taking everything day by day. This attitude permeates their relationships as well. ESTPs simply reevaluate their commitments on a daily basis and adjust their behavior accordingly.
    From the sexual perspective, ESTPs simply like to have fun and enjoy the bond with their partner from the physical perspective. People with this personality type also tend to be very sensual and willing to experiment. They usually find it easy to separate sex and love, which can also cause some tension in the relationship. Many other personality types see intimacy as one of the best ways to express their love, expecting their partners to verbalize their feelings or at least express them in a non-verbal way in such situations. In contrast, ESTPs tend to approach intimacy from the purely physical perspective.

    ESTP personalities are very perceptive, able to notice even the slightest change in their partner’s mood or behavior. Even though they are not very sensitive or emotional, that impressive perceptiveness makes it easier for ESTPs to recognize their partner’s needs and desires. And, as already mentioned above, an ESTP will always know how to surprise their partner. Their unpredictability and curiosity will always keep the flame of the relationship burning—as long as the ESTP is willing to put in the effort.
    Preferred partners: ISTJ and ISFJ types, as their Introversion (I) and Judging (J) traits counterbalance ESTPs’ Extraversion (E) and Prospecting (P) traits.

    ESTP personalities are likely to be easy-going and tolerant friends, with whom it is never boring. Their imagination and spontaneity are truly enviable; ESTPs will always be able to come up with interesting ideas to explore and find fun things to do. They live completely in the present, caring little about the past or the future, and this is one of the reasons why they are so charming and popular.
    ESTPs seem to get along with everybody and make new friends wherever they go. They are honest, straightforward, and do not really worry about how other people perceive them; this trait helps them attract friends that share the same attitude toward life. ESTPs enjoy practical and physical activities, so they usually have plenty of opportunities to forge new friendships in environments that feel natural to them. It is very unlikely that ESTPs will seek friends who enjoy intellectual and philosophical debates. People with this personality type have their feet firmly on the ground and are more interested in what is than what could be.

    That being said, ESTPs are also prone to engaging in risky behaviors and may encourage their friends to join in as well. People with this personality type seek excitement and hate getting bored more than anything. This means that they will be more willing to explore new things, but such a trait has obvious downsides as well.

    ESTP personalities are likely to be practical and flexible parents, willing to spend a lot of time with their children. Their spontaneity and curiosity are truly irreplaceable when it comes to parenting. ESTPs enjoy sports, outdoor activities, and hands-on hobbies; in all likelihood, they will encourage their children to participate as well. This is also how the ESTP will bond with their children—not by discussing deep topics or establishing a strong emotional connection, but by having fun together.

    ESTPs are likely to give their children plenty of freedom, letting them make less important decisions on their own and treating them as equal members of the family. As ESTPs dislike being constrained by rules and regulations themselves, they will not try to control their children’s lives in this way either. ESTP personalities will also probably encourage their children to follow their own judgment and listen to their own hearts instead of worrying about what other people might expect from them.
    Finally, ESTP parents also tend to be very observant as far as their children’s behavior and habits are concerned. However, they may have difficulties connecting to their children at the emotional level. People with this personality type are logical and practical individuals, and they usually see emotions and feelings as distracting and irrational. This may cause tension if their children belong to one of the Feeling types.

    When it comes to a career, ESTP personalities have a long and diverse list of jobs to choose from. People with this personality type are quick decision-makers, which makes them excellent candidates for roles that require thinking on the feet—e.g., sales, emergency services, crisis management, military, law enforcement, etc. This is further reinforced by the fact that ESTPs live in the present moment and like to see the results of their actions immediately instead of thinking about the future. They also tend to be very charming and popular individuals with excellent networking skills; such traits can give them a great advantage.

    ESTP personalities also tend to be quite impatient, which means that careers or roles involving meticulous research or repetitive tasks are not a good fit for them. ESTPs are very observant, and this trait can be very useful in certain professions (e.g., sales or marketing), but their curious and energetic nature will push them toward action-oriented rather than highly analytical roles. It is very difficult to imagine an ESTP choosing a secure yet boring job over a less stable but more exciting career path. ESTPs enjoy taking risks, big and small, and usually come out as winners.
    ESTPs dislike restrictive rules and highly structured environments, often choosing to trust their own abilities and ideas instead of waiting for someone “at the top” to tell them what to do. This sometimes lands the ESTP in trouble, but it can also push them up the career ladder (if there is one). For instance, people with this personality type can be brilliant entrepreneurs and freelancers. Their boldness and improvisation skills can be a formidable advantage in a competitive environment.

    Finally, ESTP personalities can be excellent athletes. They tend to be very competitive and energetic, which are great traits when it comes to careers in sports. ESTPs are thrilled by action, and there are few better ways to expend all that energy than by becoming a professional athlete, a coach, or a sports commentator.

  5. Aidan Galasso says:

    I got ISTP.

    ISTP strengths

    Optimistic and energetic. ISTP personalities tend to be cheerful, energetic individuals who always seem to have something to do. They rarely get stressed and prefer to go with the flow rather than plan their next steps.
    Good at dealing with crisis situations. ISTPs do not mind taking risks (this can also be a weakness—see below) and can easily think on their feet, making snap decisions when necessary. Crises do not really scare them.
    Very creative and practical. ISTP personalities have a vivid imagination, especially when it comes to practical or mechanical matters. They find it easy to come up with novel ideas and do things in a way that no one has thought of before.
    Relaxed. People with this personality type live in the present and often simply go with the flow, not worrying too much about the future. This is one of the main reasons why they rarely get anxious about anything.
    Know how to prioritize. Despite being quite unpredictable, ISTP personalities are very good at conserving their energy and releasing it only when necessary.
    Both spontaneous and rational. ISTPs are able to combine spontaneity with logic, switching from one “mode” to another, depending on the situation. This makes them very flexible and versatile individuals.

    ISTP weaknesses

    Can be very stubborn. ISTPs are not too sensitive when it comes to conflicts and criticism, but they can become very blunt and irritated if someone tries to criticize their habits, lifestyle, or ideas.
    Private and reserved. Surprisingly, ISTPs can be very difficult to get to know as they keep most of their thoughts and ideas to themselves, especially when it comes to private or sensitive matters.
    Get bored quickly. People with the ISTP personality type may find it difficult to remain focused on something for an extended amount of time, with their thoughts drifting off to more interesting things.
    May be insensitive. ISTPs tend to be very practical and logical, and they may often inadvertently hurt other people’s feelings by failing to recognize the importance of emotions.
    Enjoy taking risks. ISTP personalities are big risk takers and may often do that simply for the sake of having fun. For instance, they may escalate a conflict with a colleague just to see how they react.
    Dislike commitments. ISTPs like to review their obligations on a daily basis instead of committing to something for a very long time. This can cause significant problems in their romantic relationships.

  6. My personality Type Is: ESTP.
    Mind – Extraverted (38%),
    Energy -Observant (29%)
    Nature – Thinking (11%)
    Tactics – Prospecting (21%)
    Identity – Turbulent (12%)

    This is soooooo me!!!

    Forming around 4% of the population, people with the ESTP personality type are very social, spontaneous, and direct. Some may even see them as rude or reckless, but ESTPs truly love action and always dive right into the heart of the storm. ESTPs dislike theoretical debates or thinking about the future. They are interested only in the present moment and focus all their efforts on enjoying what is rather than thinking about what could be.

    ESTPs would rather do something quickly than prepare a detailed action plan, figure out all its flaws, and—only then—act. They do not mind stepping back and fixing their mistakes, if necessary. People with this personality type also have an innate ability to pick up on other people’s thoughts and motives. Being extraordinarily perceptive, ESTPs can easily detect the slightest change in someone’s facial expression, clothing, behavior, etc. No other personality type has this mysterious ability.

    People with the ESTP personality type also tend to see laws, rules, and obligations as recommendations or instructions rather than as unbreakable principles. If ESTPs believe that something must be done and the cause is just and worthy, they will go ahead and do it, despite what the law or social rules say. This is not meant to say that ESTPs are lawbreakers—they usually have a very clear understanding of good and evil. Rather, they tend to put personal values, opinions, and principles above what other people or the society thinks.

    ESTPs enjoy drama, passion, and physical pleasures. However, people with this personality type should be aware that their passion may manifest itself in many different ways, with some of them being quite risky or unhealthy. For instance, many gamblers are ESTPs. ESTP personality traits may also push them toward inadvertently hurting other people. Because ESTPs are very direct and rely on facts and logic (the Thinking (T) trait) rather than emotions (the Feeling (F) trait), their words can easily hurt the more sensitive personality types.

    As ESTPs dislike theory and abstract thinking, they often have problems in school, especially in later years. People with this personality type see theoretical discussions as boring and pointless. In contrast, their energy and passion are virtually unlimited when it comes to activities they see as practical and exciting. ESTPs can be very inspiring and convincing. This makes them excellent sales representatives, consultants, and entrepreneurs. This personality type is truly very colorful. It is crucial that every ESTP recognizes their own talents, as well as strengths and weaknesses.

    I totally agree with this personality test. It describes me almost completely.

    • Also,

      ESTP strengths

      Bold. ESTPs enjoy pushing the limits and discovering areas that they have not yet explored, taking risks if necessary.

      Honest and direct. ESTP personalities do not mince words and prefer direct, honest answers. They see little point in mind games or social niceties.

      Very perceptive. ESTPs can easily pick up on changes in someone’s habits or appearance, and they will always know how to use that information to connect to the other person.

      Original. ESTPs enjoy experimenting and coming up with ideas and solutions that no one has thought of before.

      Rational and practical. People with this personality type do not place much importance on feelings, emotions, or ideas that are philosophical in nature. ESTPs mostly care about what makes sense and has practical uses.

      Great people skills. ESTPs do not really seek to lead or manage people, but they tend to have excellent networking skills and instinctively know how to make the best use of every social interaction.
      ESTP weaknesses

      Do not care much about rules. ESTPs are more interested in what works or makes sense to them than what is permitted or expected by society. They loathe being constrained by rules and regulations.

      Take a lot of risks. ESTP personalities do not mind taking risks and enjoy the rush of adrenaline. They may even take risks on purpose if they are bored.

      Have difficulties in the academic environment. People with this personality type are very practical, action-oriented, and hands-on individuals. They may find it difficult to cope with tasks that require patience, repetition, and theoretical knowledge.
      May be insensitive. ESTPs put rationality above feelings and may be quite uncomfortable in emotionally charged situations, not knowing how to deal with other people’s emotions. Likewise, they are likely to have difficulties expressing their own feelings.

      Impatient. ESTPs want to stay excited, and their minds are used to jumping from one thing to another, always looking for something more interesting. Consequently, they may find it difficult to remain focused for an extended period of time.
      Often miss the bigger picture. ESTP personalities prefer to jump in and deal with the problem “here and now,” which often causes them to miss the bigger picture.

  7. I’m kind of surprised how close this description is. Also, I love that one of the related people is Björk (a hero of mine).

    Forming around 4.5% of the population, INFP personalities are usually perceived as calm, reserved, or even shy. However, such an exterior can be deceptive; even though INFPs can be somewhat cautious, their inner flame and passion is not something to be taken lightly. People with this personality type are really affectionate, a trait not often seen in other types. This compassion can be really fervent and long-lasting, but the INFP will use it quite cautiously, directing their energies toward a few selected people or a worthy cause. Idealism is the banner of INFP personalities—and they are proud of it. Unfortunately, it also means that INFPs can often feel misunderstood and isolated as they are relatively rare.

    People with the INFP personality type have a clear sense of honor, which inspires and motivates them. If someone wants to get to know an INFP, it is crucial to know what drives them, to understand their chosen cause.

    INFPs seek harmony in their lives and the surrounding environment, often feeling dejected because of all the bad things happening in the world and trying hard to create something positive. People with this personality type tend to see things and actions from the idealistic perspective rather than the prism of logic. They respond to beauty, morality, and virtue rather than utility, effectiveness, or value.

    INFPs can easily speak in metaphors and parables, and they also have an amazing gift of creating and interpreting symbols; for this reason, INFPs often find it natural to write and enjoy poetry. This personality type does not worship logic, unlike the Analyst (NT) types. From the INFP’s viewpoint, logic is not always necessary. It is also likely that an INFP will enjoy hypothetical or philosophical discussions more than any other type.

    INFPs may also often retreat into their “hermit” state (this personality type can easily switch between the “active” and “hermit” states), withdrawing from the world and getting lost in their deep thoughts. Their partner may then need to spend quite a lot of effort to energize and “awaken” the INFP.

    INFPs share a trait common among the Diplomat (NF) types: their aptitude for foreign languages is unmatched. INFPs also often become great writers and actors as they can easily reflect and convey their own personalities using the fictional characters. Generally speaking, people with this personality type are extremely creative, innovative, and goal-oriented. They can be great advocates for causes they truly believe in.

    Finally, most INFPs have the ability to notice even the slightest hint of good in other people. In an INFP’s eyes, even the most revolting person will have something worthy of respect or, at the very least, sympathy.

    NFP strengths

    Passionate and energetic. INFPs tend to be very energetic when it comes to causes they believe in and are willing to fight for. They may be quiet and even shy in public, but their passion should not be underestimated.
    Very creative. INFP personalities find it easy to interpret signs and hidden meanings; furthermore, their well-developed intuition has no difficulties connecting the dots and coming up with interesting, unusual ideas.
    Open-minded and flexible. INFPs dislike being constrained by rules and do not seek to impose them on others. They tend to be fairly liberal, open-minded individuals, as long as their principles and ideas are not being challenged.
    Idealistic. INFPs are perhaps the most idealistic of all personality types, believing that people are inherently good and everyone should do their best to fight evil and injustice in the world.
    Seek and value harmony. INFPs do not want to dominate and work hard to ensure that everyone’s opinion is valued and heard.
    Can be very dedicated and hard-working. As mentioned above, INFP personalities are both very passionate and idealistic. Not surprisingly, they can also be unbelievably dedicated to their chosen cause or an organization. It is unlikely that an INFP will give up simply because everyone else has abandoned the cause or it is getting difficult to keep going.
    INFP weaknesses

    Too altruistic. INFPs may be so focused on doing good things and helping other people that they may neglect their own needs. Alternatively, they may fight for their chosen cause, ignoring everything else in life.
    Dislike dealing with data. INFP personalities are very much in tune with emotions and morality, but they are likely to have difficulties when it comes to dealing with facts and data, e.g., analyzing connections or finding discrepancies.
    Difficult to get to know. People with the INFP personality type tend to be private, reserved individuals. They are also likely to be quite self-conscious.
    Take many things personally. INFPs cherish their ideals and find it very difficult to accept criticism, taking such comments very personally. They also tend to avoid conflict situations, always looking for a solution that satisfies everybody.
    May be too idealistic. INFP personalities are prone to being too dreamy and idealistic, especially when it comes to romantic relationships. They may idealize—or even idolize—their partner, forgetting that no one is perfect.
    Impractical. INFPs do not really see practical things as important. They may even forget to eat and drink if they are doing something that excites and motivates them.

    Also, I found this friendship section to hold quite true too:

    INFP personalities are quite difficult to get to know. Even their closest friends may often find it tricky to convince the INFP to open up and reveal their feelings; casual acquaintances will not get anywhere close to their inner self. People with this personality type do not care much about how many friends they have; the quality of those friendships is far more important.

    INFP friends are exceptionally loyal and supportive. They are also good at recognizing other people’s emotional states and feelings, and this trait allows INFPs to be very sensitive and insightful. That being said, people with this personality type are likely to be quite private when it comes to their own feelings. Again, INFPs do not feel comfortable revealing their sensitive inner core to people they do not know well.

    INFP friends are likely to be intense, passionate and idealistic individuals, but the quiet and relaxed exterior of an INFP can be deceiving. On the other hand, most INFPs need a lot of “alone time” as well, and this enigmatic trait can sometimes confuse even their closest friends.

    INFPs are usually very good at reading other people’s motives and have no difficulties filtering out the suspicious individuals. However, if the INFP friend decides to open up and start trusting the other person, they will be able to form a very strong and stable relationship. It should also be noted that INFPs feel great respect for people with similar principles and values; these notions are extremely dear to people with this personality type.

    INFP personalities will probably feel most comfortable among friends belonging to other Feeling (F) and Prospecting (P) types. The rationality and perceived “coldness” of Thinking (T) types may be threatening to them, while Judging (J) types may appear too decisive and rigid. This does not mean that an INFP will be unable to communicate with these personalities on a professional level, but it is quite unlikely that they will become close friends.

    • The first time I took it there were several questions where I was stuck between choosing two separate options, so I went ahead ad took the test again using the other answers and keeping everything else consistent. This time I got ISFP. This didn’t ring as true to me, but there were definitely a few things in the description I recognize in myself.

      Forming around 8% of the population, ISFP personalities are generally seen as the most spontaneous and unpredictable of all Introverted (I) types. Only one thing is constant in their lives and that is change—ISFPs love exploring and embracing new things, ideas, and activities. They are very good at sensing such opportunities, but the ISFP personality traits also push them toward experimenting and coming up with ideas that no one has thought of before. ISFPs usually find it easy to set new trends and inspire other people. Their penchant for experimentation is unmatched by any other personality type.

      This personality trait is connected with ISFPs’ love of freedom—ISFPs are very independent and fiercely resist all forms of control. People with this personality type are the ultimate “free souls,” seeing nearly all rules, guidelines, and traditions as self-imposed limitations that make life dull and boring. ISFPs live completely in the present, refusing to dwell on the past or prepare extensive plans for the future. They take things as they come, experimenting and adapting their behavior as necessary.

      While certain personality types—especially Sentinels (SJ)—would discard such notions as irresponsible and reckless, ISFPs actually do great in areas that require an artistic, independent approach. ISFP personalities also tend to be very charming, mostly because they find it really easy to pick the best compliment for a particular person. ISFPs’ Observant (S) and Feeling (F) traits mean that they are very much in tune with the physical, sensual world. Consequently, ISFPs rarely have difficulties connecting with other people, despite being Introverted (I). Even when the ISFP is being truly unpredictable or even reckless, their charm easily disarms those around them.

      That being said, ISFPs also need time to withdraw from social interaction and let their mind rest. This personality trait can often surprise other people who may have believed that ISFPs’ spontaneity and enthusiasm meant that they would always desire to be “in the open.” However, at the end of the day, ISFPs are still Introverted (I) and their inner batteries need some time to recharge. This contributes to the air of unpredictability and mystery that usually surrounds ISFPs. If someone with this personality type is very private, even their closest friends may have difficulties anticipating an ISFP’s thoughts and reactions.

      ISFP personalities also tend to be very sensitive to other people’s feelings. They are inclined to seek harmony in all situations and have no difficulties sensing a change in someone’s emotional state. On the other hand, ISFPs can also be incredibly competitive and react very badly to any form of criticism. That competitive nature often pushes ISFPs toward risky activities such as gambling or extreme sports—and they tend to do quite well in those fields, mostly because they are so in touch with the physical environment.

      ISFPs often find it very difficult to follow a structured process and consequently may do quite poorly at school. However, their spontaneity and other personality traits make ISFPs very artistic and give them a great sense of aesthetics. People with this personality type may fall behind in the academic environment, but they can truly shine in the field that utilizes their talents while also giving the ISFP a sufficient degree of freedom.

      Finally, it is worth mentioning that ISFP personalities are very goal-driven and shape their internal principles and rules around those goals. This liberates ISFPs from social expectations and constraints, for better or for worse. If the ISFP’s goal is good and noble, they can be very selfless, amazingly charitable, and inspiring; however, if the ISFP decides to pursue a selfish goal, they can become very egocentric and even conniving, doing everything they can to achieve that goal. People with this personality type should be aware of these tendencies and question their own motives and reasoning from time to time.

  8. reigningace says:

    Your personality type: ESFP.
    Breakdown of preferences: Mind – Extraverted (4%), Energy – Observant (17%), Nature – Feeling (11%), Tactics – Prospecting (25%), Identity – Assertive (32%).

    For ESFP personalities, life is a never-ending party. Forming around 7.5% of the population, ESFPs love being the center of attention and enjoy even the simplest things. Their fun and impulsive nature is usually very attractive to other people. People with this personality type never run out of ideas and their curiosity is insatiable. They will always be among the first to try something new and exciting.

    ESFPs love communicating with other people and can spend hours upon hours chatting about various topics. An ESFP has no clearer telltale than spending the last hour talking about everything but the topic that was supposed to be the main reason for the conversation. Not surprisingly, this personality type tends to be very popular in the company of Extraverted (E) types.

    ESFP personalities live in the world of opportunities and savor the pleasures, dramas, and ideas that life throws at them. They are immersed in a never-ending performance, trying to cheer other people up. ESFPs are extremely talented at making other people feel good and excited, and they enjoy this immensely. The earthy and often unique wit of ESFPs is a perfect symbol of their playfulness.

    ESFPs have a highly developed aesthetical sense, which is one of their strongest personality traits. This type of person will enjoy creating well-decorated surroundings and recognize the value of quality in many other things.
    ESFP personalities are very observant, able to notice and respond to someone’s distressed emotional state. As planning and long-term thinking are often their weakest personality traits, ESFPs may be inferior strategists and planners, but they are very well equipped to provide practical advice and emotional support.

    The main weakness for many ESFPs is their spontaneity, which can lead to superficiality and forgetfulness. They place more emphasis on quick satisfaction than they do on their obligations and duties. ESFPs are also likely to do their best to ignore potential conflicts instead of dealing with them head-on.

    It is likely that the ESFP personality will be very practical, but not when it comes to repetitive or analytical tasks. They would rather rely on their luck or ask other people for help than spend time trying to understand a complex theory.

  9. Darius Hence

    My personality test said that I was an ESFP and for the most part is very accurate. My only question is how do they come to the conclusion of your personality, and since my class mates just posted what the test said I’ll do the same.

    For ESFP personalities, life is a never-ending party. Forming around 7.5% of the population, ESFPs love being the center of attention and enjoy even the simplest things. Their fun and impulsive nature is usually very attractive to other people. People with this personality type never run out of ideas and their curiosity is insatiable. They will always be among the first to try some ESFPs love communicating with other people and can spend hours upon hours chatting about various topics. An ESFP has no clearer telltale than spending the last hour talking about everything but the topic that was supposed to be the main reason for the conversation. Not surprisingly, this personality type tends to be very popular in the company of Extraverted (E) types.

    ESFP personalities live in the world of opportunities and savor the pleasures, dramas, and ideas that life throws at them. They are immersed in a never-ending performance, trying to cheer other people up. ESFPs are extremely talented at making other people feel good and excited, and they enjoy this immensely. The earthy and often unique wit of ESFPs is a perfect symbol of their playfulness.

    ESFPs have a highly developed aesthetical sense, which is one of their strongest personality traits. This type of person will enjoy creating well-decorated surroundings and recognize the value of quality in many other things.

    ESFP personalities are very observant, able to notice and respond to someone’s distressed emotional state. As planning and long-term thinking are often their weakest personality traits, ESFPs may be inferior strategists and planners, but they are very well equipped to provide practical advice and emotional support.

    The main weakness for many ESFPs is their spontaneity, which can lead to superficiality and forgetfulness. They place more emphasis on quick satisfaction than they do on their obligations and duties. ESFPs are also likely to do their best to ignore potential conflicts instead of dealing with them head-on.

    It is likely that the ESFP personality will be very practical, but not when it comes to repetitive or analytical tasks. They would rather rely on their luck or ask other people for help than spend time trying to understand a complex theory.

    • Carrie Brown says:

      All of these tests should be taken with a grain of salt. But Myers-Briggs is generally one of the somewhat better accepted and regularly used tests. It has its detractors and its proponents, but this is some actual research and theory behind all of this.

  10. Interesting. I usually don’t think these types of test are that accurate in describing me (my friends may disagree), but I definitely see some of myself in this:

    Your personality type: INFJ
    Strength of individual traits: Introverted: 53%, Intuitive: 15%, Feeling: 25%, Judging: 14%, Turbulent: 36%

    The INFJ type is believed to be very rare (less than 1 percent of the population) and has an unusual set of traits. Even though their presence can be described as very quiet, INFJ personalities usually have many strong opinions, especially when it comes to issues they consider really important in life. If an INFJ is fighting for something, this is because they believe in the idea itself, not because of some selfish reasons.

    INFJ personalities are drawn toward helping those in need: they may rush to the place of a major disaster, participate in rescue efforts, do charity work, etc. INFJs see this as their duty and their purpose in life. People with this personality type firmly believe that nothing else would help the world as much as getting rid of all the tyrants (though preferably in a non-violent way). Karma and similar concepts are very attractive to INFJs.

    These tendencies are also strengthened by the fact that INFJ personalities have a unique combination of idealism and decisiveness. This means that their creativity and imagination can be directed toward a specific goal. Few other personality types have this trait, and this is one of the most important reasons why many INFJs are able to eventually realize their dreams and make a lasting positive impact.

    INFJs are masters of written communication, with a distinctively smooth and warm language. In addition, the sensitivity of INFJs allows them to connect to others quite easily. Their easy and pleasant communication can often mislead bystanders, who might think that the INFJ is actually a very sociable person.

    INFJs should be careful to avoid “overheating” as their zeal and determination can sometimes get out of hand. As Introverts (I), INFJs need to have some “alone time” every once in a while; otherwise their internal energy reserves will get depleted really quickly. If this happens, the INFJ may surprise everybody around them by withdrawing from all their activities for a while, and since other people usually see INFJs as always friendly and sociable, this can leave them both surprised and concerned.

    INFJs take great care of other people’s feelings and expect others to return the favor. Unsurprisingly, people with this personality type are very sensitive and vulnerable to conflicts. Even the most rational INFJs may find it quite difficult to not take criticism personally—this is the INFJ’s Achilles’ heel. If someone with an INFJ personality cannot escape the conflict, they will do their best to deal with it head on, but this will result in a lot of stress and may also potentially lead to health problems or highly irrational behavior.

  11. I got enfj. Pretty spot on I suppose. Even suggested being a journalist.

  12. Like John I also am a type INFJ. In general I find it hard to answer those tests correctly and most of the time I feel like my answers are very random. Thus, to me the outcome sounds partly very plausible, but partly not at all, too. As an example: INFJs are supposed to be strongly decisive – that is a feature I would like to have but unfortunately do not have. But anyways, here’s more on the INFJ:

    [John Stevenson already posted the overall description for the INFJ, so I will post other things.]

    INFJ strengths:

    Determined and passionate. / Altruistic. / Decisive. / Creative. / Inspiring and convincing. / Very insightful.

    INFJ weaknesses:

    Extremely private. / Can burn out easily. / Very sensitive. / Perfectionistic. / Always need to have a cause.

    Career paths:

    To begin with, the best careers for INFJ personalities make use of their intuitive skills. INFJs tend to have a very strong intuition, which allows them to accurately judge events, situations, and other people. Furthermore, people with this personality type are idealists, and there is nothing more important than their values and principles. For these reasons, typical INFJ careers often include teaching, counselling, psychology, or creative writing.

    Next, INFJs are natural leaders, even though they do not seek nor worship positions of authority, unlike certain other personality types. They approach leadership roles from the standpoint of sensitivity and understanding rather than authority and power. Consequently, INFJs tend to do best in careers that involve a certain degree of personal touch and sensitivity. For instance, a typical INFJ career path could lead to a religious institution. INFJs also tend to be excellent HR administrators, psychiatrists, or doctors.

    INFJs dislike routine tasks, strictly impersonal work, or analysing small details. They are also very vulnerable to conflict and criticism. These traits mean that INFJs should avoid careers that typically focus on data rather than people or are prone to pressure and conflict, e.g., finance, audit, programming, data analysis, etc. On the other hand, people with this personality type are very insightful and creative; they tend to be excellent architects, musicians, artists, photographers, designers, etc. The best INFJ career paths revolve around these traits.

    Regardless of the career path, INFJs always need to feel that their contribution is meaningful. They need something more than just money or recognition. People with this personality type feel happiest when they believe that their career is very much in line with their personal values and principles. In order to achieve that, the INFJ often needs to take a leadership role, but they can also perform really well in nonmanagerial roles during their career, as long as their managers’ values match their own.

    INFJs should also be aware of their tendency to pick career goals that are way too humble. People with this personality type tend to do very well in supporting roles, but they should seek something more. INFJs tend to avoid career paths requiring a great degree of independence, but this is often the only way to further professional goals. The best INFJ careers combine the need for insightfulness with a relatively high degree of independence; this forces INFJs to improve themselves and consequently increase their contribution to the well-being of humanity. Ultimately, this makes them much happier as well.

  13. I took the personality test few weeks ago, here I share the results with you!

    My personality type is ISTJ, the same as five former U.S. presidents and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. 🙂

    The ISTJ personality type is likely to be the most popular one (around 13% of the population). “Only the facts, please” is their motto. ISTJ personalities respect facts greatly and tend to accumulate a lot of information in their own memory. One of the key contributing factors is their Observant (S) trait, which allows ISTJs to analyse the surroundings quite effortlessly.

    Due to their straightforward approach, ISTJs may encounter difficulties when it becomes necessary to comprehend a competing theory or idea. However, people with this personality type are nearly unstoppable if they believe that a specific idea is valuable and can be implemented; they will consider it their duty to establish and maintain a smooth operation. As soon as the new procedure proves its usefulness (i.e., it becomes apparent that the new approach actually works), ISTJs will put in a lot of effort to enable its successful implementation, even at the expense of their own health.

    ISTJs tend to be extremely thorough, always checking the facts and not assuming anything. ISTJs are also respected for their exceptional loyalty to their duty. Their accuracy, patience, and ability to concentrate make them ideal employees in many professions. Not surprisingly, people with this personality type gravitate toward traditional, hierarchical institutions—public service, law, military, etc.

    ISTJ personalities spend an enormous amount of time and energy performing every task they see as important, especially if it contributes to the achievement of a specific goal. However, such a commitment also has a negative side: an ISTJ will refuse to budge and spend at least some of their time doing things that they do not see as meaningful or practical, e.g., some social rituals. ISTJ personalities prefer to do things alone, but they can also work as part of a team if necessary.

    ISTJs enjoy being responsible for their actions and love the power that stems from this. They are usually jacks-of-all-trades, which can potentially lead to many significant achievements in diverse areas. ISTJs tend to be bright, logical, and wise individuals, characterized by their desire to seek a secure and stable life.

    Like other Introverted (I) and Thinking (T) personalities, ISTJs are often (mistakenly) seen as indifferent and cold. Of course, it is understandably difficult for an ISTJ to reveal their emotions or express affection, but that does not mean that they have no feelings or are insensitive.

    ISTJs are easily irritated by other people’s shortcomings. They see their own promises as sacred and cannot understand how someone could consciously fail to meet their obligations. This can be a significant disadvantage at times, as some people can abuse the ISTJ’s strong sense of duty by overloading them with work.

    ISTJ personalities tend to keep their opinions to themselves unless someone asks them directly. People with this personality type are very direct; for them, the truth is always far more important than sensitivity. This ruthless judgment is irreplaceable in refereeing or legal work. Where other people might waver, the ISTJ will make the difficult decision while ignoring the emotional background.

    ISTJs respect traditions and do their best to adhere to the existing rules and guidelines. In some cases, this trait can be so strong that the ISTJ will not break the rules, even when the consequences for breaking them pale in comparison to what would happen if those rules were followed.

    ISTJs are not particularly good at listening to their own (and especially other people’s) feelings. Consequently, they may face difficulties when it is necessary to understand other people’s emotional needs. On the other hand, ISTJs rarely have any difficulties coping with emotionally charged situations. They can always keep a cool head and act rationally.

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